MCFH S7E5 - FERAL CAT COLONY, TNR, COMMUNITY NEEDS TO UNITE

MCFH S7E5 - FERAL CAT COLONY, TNR, COMMUNITY NEEDS TO UNITE

Show: My Cat From Hell Season 7, Episode 5
Episode Title: Breaking Bald

Cats: Feral Cat Community

This feral cat colony is not contained; none of them are neutered or spayed, so the colony is rapidly multiplying.

Guardians: Ellen and her sons, Dillon and Steven

Ellen and her family live in Reseda, CA. She began feeding this colony of feral cats after her neighbor who fed them moved away.

How Bad Is It?

Ellen is feeding the feral cats in her neighborhood without any help from the community. If the community doesn’t join together to gain control of their feral cat colony, they will essentially be breeding homeless cats, most of which are un-adoptable because of their lack of socialization.

Issues

  • Feral cats pooping in yards and are considered a nuisance to neighbors.
  • None of these cats are spayed or neutered; need TNR (Trap-Neuter-Return) assistance.
  • Ellen has taken full responsibility for this feral colony; needs support from the community.

Physical Approach

Feral cat communities are very common; there are approximately 2 million feral cats in Los Angeles County alone! Feeding these cats is not enough. The community needs to join together in the effort to TNR (Trap, Neuter, and Return) the cats, otherwise, they are breeding mass amounts of cats that will probably never find homes. Feral cats have an extremely short window of time in which they can be socialized, and most are too scared of human contact because of this lack of socialization.

There are many organizations that offer TNR education and help, as well as affordable spay & neuter services, such as SNPLA, Best Friends LA, and Alley Cat Allies. You can always go online to research the TNR programs that are available in your city and state. Once you have the help and education you need, it’s time to begin trapping. 

It is recommended that you consolidate the feeding stations of your feral cats (2 stations is sufficient) to prevent them from being scattered throughout the neighborhood. Talk to your neighbors at least 48 hours in advance to inform them of the situation, and ask them to refrain from feeding any cats during this time. Stop feeding the cats 24-36 hours before trap day; hungry cats are easier to lure in. Set up your traps on the designated date, and cover them with towels or blankets so they don’t look too scary. Put your bait in the back of the traps, and then wait. With the help of Jackson, TNR volunteers, and the community, Ellen was able to trap 15 feral cats! Once they are trapped, they need to be neutered or spayed, and then returned back to the community, unable to multiply. It may be a long process, but with patience and support, it can be done.

Emotional Approach

There is often a stigma attached to people that feed cats in their community. Some neighbors may consider it to be a nuisance, and will look down upon the person feeding the ferals. In reality, people that are feeding homeless cats have huge hearts and just want to help, but often times, they just need direction and support from others to gain control of the colony.

It is also important to educate the community on TNR procedures and how they can help, because some do not understand and think it is cruel, when it is actually beneficial for everyone! (The Humane Society reports: "Unspayed female cats and dogs have a far greater chance of developing pyrometra (a fatal uterine infection), uterine cancer, and other cancers of the reproductive system. Male pets who are neutered eliminate their chances of getting testicular cancer, and it is thought that they have lowered rates of prostate cancer, as well.”)

Holistic Approach

IN ADDITION TO THE ABOVE, JACKSON ALSO USED SPIRIT ESSENCES:

Feral Flower Formula

Typically, feral cats lead a life of uncertainty and high stress. Feral Flower Formula can be helpful for trapping, neutering and returning ferals, or attempting to socialize them to humans. This formula is designed to help feral cats overcome their fears and moderate their naturally sensitive fight-or-flight response. By lowering their stress, FFF may also help to facilitate the process of domestication, and allow them to accept and reciprocate attention and affection from people. Note: not all feral cats are receptive to domestication; there will be those that will not respond. In that case, FFF can (at the very least) help those cats navigate their world with an increased sense of territorial confidence. Jackson made sure to mist Feral Flower Formula in all of the traps during this TNR mission.

 

EVERY PET IS DIFFERENT, AND HAS DIFFERENT NEEDS AND HEALING RESPONSES. SOME OTHER POSSIBLE SPIRIT ESSENCES SOLUTIONS THAT MAY BE HELPFUL IN THIS TYPE OF SITUATION ARE:

 

Stress Stopper

Stress Stopper is formulated to help animals adapt and cope with stressful situations, such as thunderstorms, boarding, remodeling, visitors, or similar situations. This formula is designed to help animals feel grounded and protected during periods of short-term stress. Stress Stopper can help to reduce any stress that cats may experience during the process of TNR – being trapped and visiting the vet for a spay/neuter procedure.

Spay/Neuter

Spay/Neuter is formulated to help restore and rebalance the male/female energies that are unavoidably disrupted by the procedure, as any surgery disrupts the body's energy fields. This solution specifically addresses the imbalances caused by sterilization, whether surgical or chemical. You can begin administering this formula to an animal the night before his surgery, and continue for about two weeks after the procedure. 

Jackson Galaxy's Spirit Essences™ work best when part of a more holistic program, that may include proper veterinary care, diet, behavior modification, and other holistic modalities.  Consult your veterinarian before adding any new product to your pet’s care regimen.  These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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